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Alexander Nicolas Keyserlingk

Does IFC seem not deem the ABE project important enough that it relegates it to the blog? Patrick Henfrey is a real hero and IFC should be proud to have him as an alumnus. This is a real story and should get a full coverage story.

Alexander Nicolas Keyserlingk

In your comments of the ABE venture, you fail to mention that Patrick Henfrey is a real entrepreneur as he has risked not only his career but also his personal net worth in launching this project. If he is successful, millions of Africans will thank their lives to Patrick's risk-taking. Africa needs more such entrepreneurs.

Per Kurowski

Please, pick the cherries!

When Andrew Jack reported in FT, April 30, “IFC plans African healthcare funds” he mentions that one concern about launching an equity fund, is to “ensure that for-profit healthcare services supported by the debt and equity funds in Africa do not simply back businesses that “cherry pick” richer patients but instead reach the poorest in rural areas in the lower income countries that suffer the most.”

Clearly we should try to find the ways to bridge the horrible needs of the poor in Africa, but while doing so let us not ignore that “cherry picking” is exactly one or perhaps the most important tool for achieving sustainable economic development. If the world had used all its health development funds to help Africa to persistently service the needs of their sweetest cherries, instead of having them go to Paris or London for treatments, then perhaps we would have allowed many more sherry seeds germinate into cherry trees and there would be more cherries in Africa.

It is amazing how sometimes development agencies are hindered from using what has proven to be good development tools in developed countries.

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